The right way to punctuate a sentence is to use our common stock of marks to their fullest, intentionally selecting them for the meaning that's intdended.

This hinges on a sensitivity to their different meanings and connotations -- which certainly change over time and with audience, but are not arbitrary either. The tone of a work, as well as the meaning on a sentence-by-sentence level, can be changed significantly by puctuation. Here is one example, punctuated variously -- all in ways that are basically acceptable today -- prefaced by how it might change the reading.

The base sentence, unpunctuated:

Yes that's true but it doesn't change anything.

Straightforward, perhaps conciliatory:

Yes, that's true, but it doesn't change anything.

Emphatic, determined:

Yes. That's true. But it doesn't change anything.

Breezy, maybe flippant:

Yes -- that's true -- but it doesn't change anything.

Hesitant:

Yes ... that's true ... but it doesn't change anything.

Patronizing:

Yes (that's true) but it doesn't change anything.

Whispered under the breath:

Yes, that's true (but it doesn't change anything).

Thoughtful:

Yes; that's true, but it doesn't change anything.

Stolid and pompous:

Yes: that's true. But it doesn't change anything.

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